Pressure cooking

Pressure cooking is the process of cooking food in a sealed vessel (known as a pressure cooker) that does not permit air or liquids to escape below a pre-set pressure. Pressure cooking allows food to be cooked with greater humidity and higher temperatures than possible with conventional boiling or steaming methods. In an ordinary non-pressurised cooking vessel, the boiling point of water is 100 °C (212 °F) at standard pressure; the temperature of food is limited by the boiling point of water because excess heat causes boiling water to vaporize into steam. In a sealed pressure cooker, the boiling point of water increases as the pressure rises, resulting in superheated water. Pressure is created initially by boiling a liquid such as water or broth inside the closed pressure cooker. The trapped steam increases the internal pressure and temperature. After use, the pressure is slowly released so that the vessel can be safely opened. Pressure cookers heat food quickly because the internal steam pressure from the boiling liquid causes saturated steam (or “wet steam”) to permeate the food. This results in faster cooking times compared to conventional cooking methods because liquids and steam conduct heat more rapidly than dry air.

Black Eyed Crostinis
Black Eyed Peas on a Baguette Serving Size: 4Calories per serving: 216Fat per serving: 0.3g This high in fiber and iron recipe literally melts in your mouth. It’s pretty simple and so nutritious for the family. The best part is the versatility of how you can serve it. My favorite way is on a hot Continue Reading
Red Kidney Beans
Red Kidney Beans Serving Size: 4-8Calories per serving: 298Fat per serving: 1.3gms This tangy tomato, onion based sauce mixed with red kidney beans not only gives you a protein boost but hits a spot on your palette. The mildness of kidney beans combined with a few Indian spices creates the best compliment of flavors. Ingredients3 Continue Reading
Spicy Chickpeas
Spicy Chickpeas Serving Size: 4-6Calories per serving: 173Fat per serving: 1.8gms A spicy north Indian dish eaten with naan, basmati rice or can even be served on a baguette. The garnishing makes all the difference for me – spring onions or parsley if you’re serving on a baguette and cilantro leaves for a more traditional Continue Reading
Loading...
Sign up to receive FREE new recipes and updates.